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10/03/2014

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Robert W. Gillett

I am having one made next week. They said it would be easier to bend in the top edges by opening up the corners a bit. I agreed to that, thinking it might even help the corners char things a little better.

Thanks, Gary!

John Hatch

I had a couple of these made and they seem to be working quite well for us. A couple of suggestions: If you are going to be taking them apart to transport, mark the top edges at each corner with zero, 1, 2, or 3 chisel marks so that you can match corners up when putting it back together. Even with care in marking, drilling and bending, there is going to be one way that everything goes together better. Second is that I don't think that the bends on the corners are going to be exactly 45 degrees going up the edge of a pyramid, but it got us close enough to bolt together with a little bit of fudging on the bolt holes and then I just adjusted things a bit with a big hammer. I think that bending to about 48 degrees would have given a better fit though. We went with the bolt together design because it could be transported in the trunk of a car rather than the back of a pickup but i do wish there was a good way to get a bottom on it and a tight seal so you could quench it with water and let it soak. May try setting it up in the bottom third of a steel barrel. Anyway, wanted to say thanks and offer my take on it so far.

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